Boxing Banjo’s Round # 1 is a thoroughly delightful album from the start. Youth, energy and a real sense of the music. 

Bill Margeson Live Ireland

Four young lads from the west of the country and that’s how De Danann started out of course. Boxing Banjo boasts fiddle and guitar from Joseph McNulty and Sean O’Meara but Mick and Dara Healy on banjo and button box occupy the centre stage. Their music is more Flanagan Brothers than De Danann, that 1920’s show band style drive and funk with an emphasis on Munster tunes. Polkas, jigs and barndances, a couple of sets of reels. Boxing Banjo keep things moving, and they’ve absorbed the lessons from Sharon Shannon, Máirtín O’Connor, Mike McGoldrick and others, so there’s never a dull moment on Round #1. A thumping version of The Mouse in the Kitchen, bags of swing onRocking the Boat, and a splendid romp through Lough Mountain are highlights for me. Mick ventures vocals on Don’t Think Twice, and it pays off: his Dingle Dylan delivery is very pleasant, drawling and tuneful, with a bouncy bluegrass banjo break to top it off. McNulty turns his hand to song accompaniment effortlessly, and lashes into the tunes too, while O’Meara follows Steve Cooney and Gavin Ralston with his percussive guitar style, hitting the beat and hitting it hard. Reels range across Ireland for The Jolly Tinker and Dinky Dorian’s. A couple of tracks stray even further afield with Carna Czardas and Fleur de Mandragore. The only time these lads slow down is for the Brian Finnegan 7/8 Marga’s Moment, and the song Fire and Rain, which was written by James Taylor. Otherwise it’s full steam ahead, sucking diesel, fuelled by red-hot banjo and pumping box, great entertainment from start to finish.

Alex Monaghan Irish Music Magazine

Tenor banjo player Mícheál ‘Mick’ Healy from Castlebar in Co. Mayo had been only nineteen years old, when we reviewed his 2012 debut album “Pleckin’ About.” Last summer Mick and his older brother Dara (button accordion), who took part in many recording sessions such as “Pleckin’ About” or Sinéad Healy’s “Shuffle the Deck,” decided to quit their daytime jobs as school teachers to become professional musicians. Together with Joseph McNulty (fiddle) and Seán O’Meara (guitar), the latter has performed and toured with The Olllam, their new outfit called Boxing Banjo has released their debut album. “Round #1” is an exciting mix of traditional Irish music and American old-time and bluegrass music. It is rhythmical and sonorous, which recalls the 1920s show band style of the Flanagan Brothers (Mick became acquainted with it playing with the Brock McGuire Band) on the one hand and bands such as North Cregg or accordionist Mairtin O’Connor (composer of the included “Rocking the Boat”) on the other. There are jigs and reels, barndances and Sliabh Luachra polkas. With Mairtin O’Connor’s Irish-Hungarian “Carna Czardas” and Michel Bordeleau’s crooked Quebecois “Fleur de Mandragore” they leave the beaten track for a moment or two. The lads only cool things down for Brian Finnegan’s 7/8 tune “Marga’s Moment”. There are four gifted vocalists in the band, but only two songs featured here, both delivered by Mick. His selection is taken from contemporary folk music, namely a frisky rendition of Bob Dylan’s “Don’t Think Twice,” including a splendid bluegrass banjo break, and James Taylor’s “Fire and Rain” with strings and all.

Tom Keller FolkWorld Germany

Boxing Banjo is a youthful new Irish quartet playing mostly high energy Irish music with some American influences. Consisting of fiddle and guitar from Joseph McNulty and Sean O’Meara and Mick and Dara Healy on banjo and button box, the ensemble arsenal is solid and reliable.

The emphasis is on Munster tunes, regionalised Sliabh Luachra polkas, jigs and barn dances, and a couple of sets of reels for good measure. However

There is an equal dollop of The Flanagan Brothers’ poise, and some surprises too. Testosterone abounds in the rugged and exciting tune sets performed at 90MPH. They swing the pulse easily with one eye on the dance floor and the other on the metronome – steady as the proverbial rock.

Musically the highly rhythmic style recalls Four Men And A Dog and North Cregg, with accordion, fiddle and banjo blazing a trail behind some precise and suitably zingy guitar backing. The song choice is intriguingly different to most groups, concentrating on the American contemporary folk songbook. Bob Dylan’s Don’t Think Twice is rendered at a sprightly gallop by Mick, with a bright bluegrass banjo break included. The only time they slow down is for James Taylor’s Fire and Rain – a judicious choice complete with brooding string arrangement and pensive vocal from Mick Healy. This and Brian Finnegan’s 7/8 Marga’s Moment show the band’s versatility and prove that it is not a one paced dance music machine.

Round #1 is a promising beginning for an exciting energetic young band that also possesses a startling degree of accomplished maturity. Check it out.

John O’Regan The Living Tradition